Dr. Rajul Vasa

To make the stroke patient aware, that consistent use of the good side of the body to sit down, to stand up & to walk brings in morphological changes in your brain and can hamper recovery of your affected side.

Your feet are the foundation on which your tall body is mounted. Get alert if your affected foot begins to feel rigid, solid, heavy, spastic, and no longer pliable & begins to turn inwards & drops or slaps while walking demanding your constant attention. Do not accept the problem as part & parcel of the stroke. You can certainly avoid it.

  • Be alert if your leg becomes a simple prop, barely supporting you while you are walking. Get alert in time before your brain accepts it in the long-term memory & makes it as permanent.
  • In the brain everything is connected to everything else & therefore if your foot gets spastic it influences your hand from recovering so please do not look at the arm recovery separate from the leg. Any use, abuse, & misuse of the leg is certainly going to reflect on your arm.
  • Do not misunderstand the bent elbow, hooking wrist with finger fisting as a sign of good recovery, it can be a spastic abnormal posture that prevents the arm from reaching out easily, smoothly, energy effectively & economically. Splints may not be a good idea for your spastic wrist & finger, as it can add on to the spasticity by providing constant passive stretch to the already tight muscles.
  • Foot drop splint can also add on to contractures in ankle & foot while walking & maintain the heel cord tight.
  • Constant use of good side to sit, stand & walk with external support may give you short-lived independence but it also gives you most undesirable lifetime of functional division in the one whole integral self.`
  • Get alert when you need to focus very highly to complete simple daily movements. Stop doing unnatural movements because general movements are highly automatic effortless & spontaneous, and true recovery is to achieve automatism in your daily movements.

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